operation manuals

A general, non-powerplant specific, discussion on airboat technology, ie., hulls, rigging, polymer, etc..
kitthackeray
Southern Airboat Member
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operation manuals

Postby kitthackeray » Sun Nov 06, 2016 5:59 pm

Hi, I am coming to the end - I hope - of 2 years trying to register 2 Florida built airboats overseas. Now theyre hitting me with the need for a full manual and so I'm asking if there is anywhere I can download some material that gives an overview of airboating, safety, the do's and dont's and maybe a hint on how to calculate buoyancy...

I know my length and breadth and draft and I can work out my displacement in cubes of water..... but buoyancy? How does it relate? Is it the amount of water you can put in the boat till it sinks?

If anyone can help Id be much obliged.... Details on the Levitator I have, but there was no documentation on the boats when I got them. Bureaucracy in English is the pits. In a foreign language its a whole new ball game.

Best to all

Kit Thackeray

CBaetzman
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Re: operation manuals

Postby CBaetzman » Sun Nov 06, 2016 7:40 pm

http://www.dep.state.fl.us/admin/safety ... Manual.pdf


This is the Airboat Safety Link for the State of Florida.

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Deano
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Re: operation manuals

Postby Deano » Sun Nov 06, 2016 9:42 pm

Not sure what you're after as far as buoyancy goes, but Archimedes Principle tells us:

Any object, wholly or partly immersed in a fluid, is buoyed up
by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the object
.

Given that fresh water weighs 62.4 lbs and salt water weighs 64 lbs per cubic foot,
that would be the amount of weight that one cubic foot of air will make neutrally buoyant.

Hope that helps. :dontknow:
"The suppression of uncomfortable ideas may be common in religion and politics,
but it is not the path to knowledge; it has no place in the endeavor of science."
- Carl Sagan

Gonesouth
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Re: operation manuals

Postby Gonesouth » Thu Dec 08, 2016 8:28 pm

A rough calculation of your buoyancy would be to calculate the volume of your hull before water would flow over the sides. That volume multiplied by the unit weight of water (salt or fresh above) would be your buoyancy. Net Buoyancy is the total weight of the boat subtracted from that. You would want some reserve. A lot of reserve actually. But that weight if distributed properly would be the theoretical weight your boat could carry before water came over the sides. There are a lot of other important factors. Such as safe carrying capacity that assumes the weight could be anywhere. How deep can your boat safely draft. But to answer the question that will get you an answer.

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goldhunter_2
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Re: operation manuals

Postby goldhunter_2 » Thu Dec 08, 2016 9:22 pm

there is a old thread on here but don't remember the tittle , maybe you can try the search feature for airboat safety do's and don'ts (or something like that)

Honesty the best safety tip we could give you is to find a "experienced" airboat operator , ask him to take you out for a ride to show you the ins and out then ask him to go with you the first few times to practice in skinny water until he says your ok to g n your own ,,,,,, stick time is important
.


Support our future , get a kid involved in the outdoors!!

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