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Running in salt water

Posted: Fri May 24, 2019 8:20 pm
by Hotdog
Just wanted to get opinions on running in salt water. I have a aluminum hull with Polly. I live close to salt water so thinking about running the boat there. Does anyone run in salt water

Re: Running in salt water

Posted: Fri May 24, 2019 8:53 pm
by unforgiven11B
I live near the gulf close to Yankeetown and Cedar key usually fish in winter for reds. A lot of people run the salt water. I always run freshwater after or pressure wash it immediately after.

Re: Running in salt water

Posted: Fri May 24, 2019 8:56 pm
by barhopper
Run saltwater 99% of the time. Aluminum, stainless, and poly. Wash it down when you’re down and it’s good to go.

Re: Running in salt water

Posted: Fri May 24, 2019 9:23 pm
by Hotdog
I’m just thinking about salt water getting in between the Hull and Polly. Then salt sitting in there and corrosion starting

Re: Running in salt water

Posted: Sat May 25, 2019 6:13 am
by barhopper
Hasn’t been a problem for me yet. Current boat is a 2005 that I’ve changed the poly on 3 times so far. I’ve not seen any damaged to the metal under the poly. I do get some corrosion from where the stainless fasteners attach the poly through the hull but I believe that’s from the dissimilar metals not the salt water.

Re: Running in salt water

Posted: Sat May 25, 2019 7:08 am
by Hotdog
Thanks for the info

Re: Running in salt water

Posted: Sat Jun 01, 2019 11:21 pm
by Rick McC.
I run 100% in the saltwater; aluminum hull with no poly.

Boat is almost 13 years old now with no problems.

Re: Running in salt water

Posted: Sun Jun 02, 2019 7:41 am
by SWAMPHUNTER45
Often it is the alloy, dissimilar metals or galvanic reaction that makes for the saltwater issues. Today's modern commercial hulls fare well. That said stainless and aluminum will never have a long marriage in the saltwater. Evinrude the outboard maker learned that long ago.

Re: Running in salt water

Posted: Sun Jun 02, 2019 9:11 am
by Slidin Gator
barhopper wrote:I do get some corrosion from where the stainless fasteners attach the poly through the hull but I believe that’s from the dissimilar metals not the salt water.
Have you ever considered aluminum fasteners?

Re: Running in salt water

Posted: Sun Jun 02, 2019 5:20 pm
by Rick McC.
I forgot to note in my previous post that my boat has all stainless rigging.

I had a 12’ fiberglass (no poly) DD Buick 350 boat from @ ‘83-‘90 that had a conduit cage and square tubing rigging. I fought a never ending battle with rust, replacing the engine stand once, and cutting/replacing other pieces on a never-ending basis.

I’m sure that living on Pine Island for several of those years added a good bit to the problem, as even the morning dew was salty there.

I firmly believe that stainless rigging is a must for a saltwater boat.

Re: Running in salt water

Posted: Sun Jun 02, 2019 8:23 pm
by barhopper
I have not considered aluminum. I worry about snatching them out when the polymer get worn. I have gone to brass nylocs so I don’t have any problems removing nuts when changing the polymer. Nothing makes your day than 4 or 5 stainless nylocs that won’t come off.

Re: Running in salt water

Posted: Mon Jun 03, 2019 7:55 pm
by Slidin Gator
barhopper wrote:I have not considered aluminum. I worry about snatching them out when the polymer get worn. I have gone to brass nylocs so I don’t have any problems removing nuts when changing the polymer. Nothing makes your day than 4 or 5 stainless nylocs that won’t come off.
No doubt it is hard to say. Aluminum won't hold up to oyster bar wear and tear, so they would need to be countersunk deeper. The potential advantage is changing the corrosion equation.

The problem with SST fasteners in Aluminum is that SST is more Noble than Aluminum. This means that the aluminum corrodes to protect the SST fastener. In many cases, this is the right selection so the connection does not fail. In this case, perhaps the fasteners last longer than needed for poly eatin Oysters and it would be best if the hull didn't corrode :scratch:

Google "Galvanic Chart" and you will find reams of info. Touch 2 different metals together and then create an external electrical path (like salt water) and you have a battery. The further apart on the galvanic chart that these two metals are, the higher the voltage potential between the two.

The more Anodic of the two metals is the Negative in the battery. This is why electrical issues most typically occur on boat ground points, that is the part that corrodes. It's actually a good thing that fixing the grounds fixes the problem, there are usually less of them, imagine having to chase all the potential corrosion issues on these new electronic machines with positive ground??? Glad the world sorted out that bad idea.

The anode disappears and the material re-appears at the cathode (All that abrasive White powder, aluminum oxide, under the threads of old SST fasteners). That oxide under the threads is what starts the galling process with SST fasteners. Nyloc's add heat which makes this more likely to happen. Never use electric or air tools to dis-assemble old SST nylocs, they heat up and gall. Stick with hand tools to go slow and you save time.

I have never used Aluminum screws for Poly, my stuff is riveted. But I get screws for a Gulf Boat, you just said 3 poly jobs in 12 years, them oysters are sharp. I am just thinking Al screws might make your life easier long term. Al screws. are going to be equal to or slightly anodic to a marine grade aluminum hull. This means that the screws will corrode, not the hull. But being closer on the chart, the corrosion rate will be slower. 2024 AL is stronger (and more available in screws) but will corrode a bit faster. 6061 is an option and is closest to 5052 marine grade for a welded salt water hull.

Given the frequency of your poly jobs, maybe try swapping out a few screws for aluminum and see how they hold up. Worst case you have to drill out some aluminum screws (way easier than SST screws). Best case they fall off on their own, just when it is time for new poly, leaving perfect holes in the hull, no corrosion, ready for new poly and screws.
Hotdog wrote:Just wanted to get opinions on running in salt water. I have a aluminum hull with Polly. I live close to salt water so thinking about running the boat there. Does anyone run in salt water
Hotdog,
Go run it wherever you want to. It's not gonna fall apart in 5 years. Salt water definitely drives corrosion, but if you can get rid of it with a fresh water run and wash down, then the damage is limited to the time on the water. I have a thread going covering details of re-doing a 7075 riveted hull (the most corrosive set up) that has seen 30 years of brackish and salt water use. We are about to strip the poly, so stay tuned. A fresh water run cleans the salt out of the area between poly and hull. When you get home, fill the hull with fresh water to clean the salt out between the runners and hull.

Re: Running in salt water

Posted: Mon Jun 03, 2019 8:18 pm
by Hotdog
Thanks for the info. Appreciate it

Re: Running in salt water

Posted: Tue Jun 04, 2019 9:59 am
by Duece
15 year old boat here 75-85 percent of the time run in salt water. Aluminum hull and stainless rigging and have 0 corrosion issues.

Duece

Re: Running in salt water

Posted: Wed Jun 05, 2019 2:38 pm
by Keeth1123
Where are you guys running in salt water with airboats? Every place I’ve been in my skiff I would never take my airboat. Many idle zones with huge wake from aholes driving around

Re: Running in salt water

Posted: Wed Jun 05, 2019 3:11 pm
by unforgiven11B
Most of us that chimed in run between Homosassa and steinhatchee, and everything in between. The big bend area where we are is pretty shallow with a ton of oyster beds. Running the creeks in winter for reds in yankeetown and cedar key. Waccassaa river, withlachoochee, ten mile, otter, Chaz, Suwannee and free others dump in right in this area

Re: Running in salt water

Posted: Thu Jun 06, 2019 10:36 pm
by Prototype
barhopper wrote:I have not considered aluminum. I worry about snatching them out when the polymer get worn. I have gone to brass nylocs so I don’t have any problems removing nuts when changing the polymer. Nothing makes your day than 4 or 5 stainless nylocs that won’t come off.
Please post pics and supply of brass nylocks!

Scallop question

Posted: Fri Jun 07, 2019 5:52 am
by Andy
How far north of Crysral River have any of you guys found scallops?

Re: Running in salt water

Posted: Fri Jun 07, 2019 5:54 am
by SWAMPHUNTER45

Re: Scallop question

Posted: Fri Jun 07, 2019 5:48 pm
by Rick McC.
Andy wrote:How far north of Crysral River have any of you guys found scallops?
South of Chaz, and a bit further south from there.

DUH, Sorry, that’s south of where you asked. :oops:

Re: Running in salt water

Posted: Fri Jun 07, 2019 5:51 pm
by Rick McC.
Keeth1123 wrote:Where are you guys running in salt water with airboats? Every place I’ve been in my skiff I would never take my airboat. Many idle zones with huge wake from aholes driving around
Pine Island Bay, then north, as far as Fish Creek and Haulover, which is just south of Chaz.

Re: Running in salt water

Posted: Thu Jun 13, 2019 5:55 pm
by barhopper
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Southern Blade and Bolt in Ocala Fl. Owner is a airboater.

Re: Running in salt water

Posted: Sun Jun 16, 2019 8:16 am
by Duece
Rick McC. wrote:
Keeth1123 wrote:Where are you guys running in salt water with airboats? Every place I’ve been in my skiff I would never take my airboat. Many idle zones with huge wake from aholes driving around
Pine Island Bay, then north, as far as Fish Creek and Haulover, which is just south of Chaz.
Must be more than 1 Fish Creek in that area. The one I know about is in between the St. Martin's River and Crystal River which would north of Chaz.

Duece

Re: Running in salt water

Posted: Sun Jun 16, 2019 12:50 pm
by Coastslider
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Re: Running in salt water

Posted: Sun Jun 16, 2019 3:48 pm
by Prototype
barhopper wrote:[9DC3CFD4-DF27-4A4C-B5FE-749247A40246.jpeg

Southern Blade and Bolt in Ocala Fl. Owner is a airboater.
Thanks,
Couple post on this and at twice the price of SS, but on occasion? Granted since SS went overseas it needs lube for on or off, handy to have a Brass one ready. Actually not the threads or SS but the nylock material itself is the main issue now days!